Putin Builds Naval and Army Base on Wrangel Island – Owned By the US

Putin Builds Naval and Army Base on Wrangel Island – Owned By the US

January 26, 2015


In 2014 Russia unloaded block-modules on Wrangel Island and Cape Schmidt for the construction of military camps. The complex is being erected in the form of a star. (Moscow Times)

In May 1881 US explorers approached Jeannette Island, Wrangel Island and Henrietta Island in the Arctic Ocean and claimed them for the United States.

But according to the Obama Department of State no claim exists today over these US islands. In fact the State Department is conspiring with Russian President Putin to give away Wrangel Island to Russians. Wrangel and its 200 mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ) has billions of barrels of oil/gas reserves and hundreds of millions of pounds of fisheries. It also has a strategic military location for tracking Russian moves in Arctic.

The Coast Guard is a component of the Department of Homeland Security.
It unequivocally states:

“On 12 August 1881, he [William Reynolds] was at the head of the party that landed on what would be later named Wrangel Island and took
possession of the island in the name of the United States.”

The State Department keeps on pumping out false and misleading statements in a supposed “Fact Sheet”. The actual facts are presented at statedepartmentwatch.org.

Now, Vladimir Putin has begun construction of a naval base and army base on Wrangel without so much as a peep from the State Department or President Obama. Something is tragically wrong here.

Background facts here and here.

The State Department has undertaken the giveaway with Putin in the guise of a maritime boundary agreement between Alaska and Siberia. But as an executive agreement, it could be reversed with the stroke of a pen by President Obama or Secretary Kerry.

The agreement was negotiated in total secrecy. The state of Alaska was not allowed to participate in the negotiations, Congress was not notified, nor was the public given any opportunity for comment. The Alaska Legislature has passed resolutions of opposition, and so has California’s legislature.

President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry could stop the giveaway with the stroke of a pen. But they won’t.

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Doomsday Clock

Doomsday clock inches forward to three minutes from catastrophic Midnight


The end of civilisation is nigh, according to ‘doomsayers’. Picture: Thinkstock. Source: News Limited


DOOMSAYERS, prepare your bunkers. The ‘Doomsday Clock’ is ticking.

The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, a group founded by the creators of the atomic bomb, say the world is now three minutes from a catastrophic midnight and the closest it has been in 30 years.

The clock moved forward two minutes, citing global warming and the proliferation of nuclear weaponry as the world’s greatest threats.

Atomic testing in the 1950s saw the Doomsday Clock move closer to midnight than it has ever been. Picture shows testing in the Australian outback. Source: News Corp Australia

“This is about Doomsday; this is about the end of civilisation as we know it,” Bulletin executive director Kennette Benedict said.

“The probability of global catastrophe is very high, and the actions needed to reduce the risks of disaster must be taken very soon.”

The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists was created in 1945 and the clock first appeared two years later on the Bulletin’s magazine cover. The minute hand has moved as far from midnight as 17 minutes (1991) but was once just two minutes away (1953).


Climate scientist Richard Somerville said a ‘major climatic disruption’ could be imminent. Picture: Cliff Owen / AP Source: AP

The last time the clock was at three minutes to midnight was in 1983 during the Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union.

Richard Somerville, a member of the 20-member board of scientists at the Bulletin, said the burning of fossil fuels will lead to a “major climatic disruption globally”.

‘The urgency has nothing to do with politics or ideology,” Dr Somerville said.

“It arises from the laws of physics and biology and chemistry”.

 

See the book on “Basic Survival and Communications Skills in the Aftermath”.  Kindle digital format.

http://www.amazon.com/Basic-Survival-Communications-Skills-Aftermath-ebook/dp/B00Q3ZWRIE

 

 

A Doomsday Plane Reminder: Nuclear Weapons Haven’t Gone Away

Here’s a news item you may have missed over the holidays. The “doomsday planes” are being upgraded. Four E-4B flying command posts that would be used by U.S. leaders to manage military operations in a nuclear war will receive communications upgrades to enhance their “connectivity” during a conflict that could spell the end of civilization as we know it.

The reason you may have missed the story is that almost nobody besides InsideDefense.com reported it. National media were too busy covering more weighty matters like the efforts of North Korean agents to suppress a Sony film farce that insults the Dear Leader, and the attack on a French satirical magazine by a motley crew of extremists. How could nuclear Armageddon compete with that?

In fairness, the proposed upgrades to the “national airborne operations center” are just part of a routine reprogramming request that the Pentagon has submitted to Congress. But how often does any facet of the nation’s nuclear complex see the light of day in national media? Other than cheating scandals and an occasional misplaced weapon, the media have ceased paying attention to the most likely way in which America might one day disappear forever.

America’s military hasn’t. One of the four doomsday planes is kept on continuous alert and manned at all times. The planes are designed to stay airborne as long as a week with aerial refueling. All of the on-board equipment is hardened against nuclear effects, including the cockpit windows which are covered with mesh similar to that on your microwave oven. If called into service because of a nuclear crisis, the heavily modified Boeing 747s could each carry a crew of over a hundred specialists for managing the conflict, with communications transmitted through satellite uplinks and a wire antenna trailing five miles behind the plane. If the president and defense secretary have been killed, there are plans in place for devolving command to the most senior official still available.

U.S. military planners take this threat so seriously that when the president goes overseas, one of the doomsday planes always follows. It needs to be nearby at all times, as does the military aide within a few yards of the president carrying nuclear launch codes and communications gear. Similar provisions have been made in Russia, which maintains most of its intercontinental ballistic missiles on a high state of alert for fear of losing them in an American first strike.

The Russians are improving the survivability of their long-range missiles by deploying more of them on mobile launchers that can’t be targeted as easily as fixed silos. But you probably haven’t heard about that either, so let me tell you a bit about them. Most of the missiles will likely be equipped with four warheads that can be independently targeted. We don’t know what the explosive force of each warhead is, however a typical yield for the Russian strategic force is around 500 kilotons — equivalent to half a million tons of conventional high explosives.

There’s nothing conventional about nuclear weapons, though. When a conventional munition is exploded, it heats the immediate vicinity by a few thousand degrees. The heat of a nuclear blast at its center is more akin to tens of millions of degrees. So if one of those 500-kiloton warheads is exploded a mile above Boston or Dallas, everything within a one-mile radius is destroyed, heavy damage extends to three miles, and fires will be widespread out to five miles. Not that it will matter to most of the people near ground zero — they will be killed immediately by blast effects or a wind-spread firestorm that expands faster than they can escape (initial wind speed: 700 miles per hour). People further away will linger longer before succumbing to the effects of prompt and delayed radiation. Electronic devices will be shut down for a hundred miles in every direction due to the electromagnetic pulse generated by the blast.

And that’s just the effects from one nuclear warhead. Russia has over 2,000 nuclear warheads capable of reaching America, a fact that will not change materially if pending arms-control agreements are implemented. That’s actually a big improvement from where things stood at the end of the Cold War, when Russia had over 40,000 strategic and tactical nuclear weapons in its arsenal; the number has shrunk by 90% today if you don’t count the weapons awaiting disassembly.

However, there things are likely to sit for the foreseeable future, because as you undoubtedly have heard, Washington and Moscow aren’t getting along these days. In fact, the relationship is going so poorly that many in the Russian capital fear an attack from the West, which is one reason why strategic rocket forces are kept on a high state of alert. The likelihood of new arms agreements in such circumstances is not high. Besides, U.S. arms-control strategy is grounded in a series of assumptions about how to stabilize the strategic balance that requires giving Russia an “assured destruction” capability against America, so arms agreements aren’t going to eliminate the specter of nuclear war. U.S. military experts figure that if the arsenals on each side fall much below a thousand “deliverable” warheads, cheating would be encouraged by the prospect of achieving military advantage in a future nuclear exchange.

Thus the main protection Americans have against Russian nuclear aggression today is Moscow’s awareness that the U.S. force could ride out a surprise attack and then retaliate by laying waste to the Motherland. That strategy appears likely to work well as long as Russian leaders are rational and don’t make miscalculations in a crisis. If they are crazy, or prone to mistakes, or lose control of their arsenal during a period of instability — well, then all bets are off. You see, a corollary assumption of the way the U.S. currently practices nuclear deterrence is that America’s own homeland can’t be well-defended. That might make Russians worry about the credibility of their deterrent, leading to a destabilizing arms race.

So here we are, apparently doomed to live with the possibility of nuclear war indefinitely. Just ten of the warheads in the Russian arsenal, optimally targeted, could collapse the U.S. electric grid. Fifty would be sufficient to render uninhabitable every U.S. city with a population of over half a million souls. Two hundred would effectively wipe out the U.S. economy, destroying all major transportation, communications, medical and financial networks. There is no guarantee that the nation could ever recover from such a catastrophe (maybe China could pick up the pieces).

Why doesn’t this story get more attention, since it’s the only manmade threat that really could wipe out our civilization? One possible reason is that people think nuclear war is very improbable – a failure of imagination, as Thomas Friedman put it after the 9-11 attacks. Another reason, perhaps, is that they’ve simply gotten used to the danger, and prefer not to think about the unthinkable. But a third possibility, which would be worth testing, is that a majority of Americans believe they are defended against nuclear attack, even though in the common-sense definition of that term they are not.

Somehow, Americans have arrived at a time in their history when they spend hundreds of billions of dollars shoring up the security of countries on the other side of the world, but have almost no protection against the one danger that could obliterate everything they cherish. This isn’t just a catastrophe waiting to happen, it is a political cause waiting to be embraced.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorenthompson/2015/01/13/a-doomsday-plane-reminder-nuclear-weapons-havent-gone-away/

Free Book Tomorrow

#survival #teotwawki #aftermath #Hamradio #communications #prepper

Wednesday Only.  Free Kindle Book.

http://www.amazon.com/Basic-Survival-Communications-Skills-Aftermath-ebook/dp/B00Q3ZWRIE/

Get your FREE copy on Wednesday.  I highly recommend this book.  Put it on your kindle.  If you do NOT have a kindle you can read it with a kindle app on your computer, but it’s a great addition to your survival books.

The author covers things like ham radio and various other radio services, scanners and even some basic survival skills.  The book is for all ages, all levels of preparedness and whether you’re an expert or novice you should find this book helpful.  The author covers the material in a sometimes humorous manner, but hits the important points.

Mr. Donaldson emphasizes the use of the personal computer in all cases, YOUR BRAIN, which will not be taken out by an EMP, or blizzard.  Survival is not about tools and collections of stuff, but using your mind.  But he does say that a good gun in your bug out bag will probably come in handy. (Personally, I think a good gun on my hip is better than one in my bug out bag, but that’s me).

 

Nuclear Weapon EMP Effects

A high-altitude nuclear detonation produces an immediate flux of gamma rays from the nuclear reactions within the device. These photons in turn produce high energy free electrons by Compton scattering at altitudes between (roughly) 20 and 40 km. These electrons are then trapped in the Earth’s magnetic field, giving rise to an oscillating electric current. This current is asymmetric in general and gives rise to a rapidly rising radiated electromagnetic field called an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Because the electrons are trapped essentially simultaneously, a very large electromagnetic source radiates coherently.

The pulse can easily span continent-sized areas, and this radiation can affect systems on land, sea, and air. The first recorded EMP incident accompanied a high-altitude nuclear test over the South Pacific and resulted in power system failures as far away as Hawaii. A large device detonated at 400-500 km over Kansas would affect all of CONUS. The signal from such an event extends to the visual horizon as seen from the burst point.

The EMP produced by the Compton electrons typically lasts for about 1 microsecond, and this signal is called HEMP. In addition to the prompt EMP, scattered gammas and inelastic gammas produced by weapon neutrons produce an intermediate timesignal from about 1 microsecond to 1 second. The energetic debris entering the ionosphere produces ionization and heating of the E-region. In turn, this causes the geomagnetic field to heave,producing a late-time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) EMP generally called a heave signal.

Initially, the plasma from the weapon is slightly conducting; the geomagnetic field cannot penetrate this volume and is displaced as a result. This impulsive distortion of the geomagnetic field was observed worldwide in the case of the STARFISH test. To be sure, the size of the signal from this process is not large, but systems connected to long lines (e.g., power lines, telephone wires, and tracking wire antennas) are at risk because of the large size of the induced current. The additive effects of the MHD-EMP can cause damage to unprotected civilian and military systems that depend on or use long-line cables. Small, isolated, systems tend to be unaffected.

Military systems must survive all aspects of the EMP, from the rapid spike of the early time events to the longer duration heave signal. One of the principal problems in assuring such survival is the lack of test data from actual high-altitude nuclear explosions. Only a few such experiments were carried out before the LTBT took effect, and at that time the theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of HEMP was relatively poor. No high-altitude tests have been conducted by the United States since 1963. In addition to the more familiar high-yield tests mentioned above, three small devices were exploded in the Van Allen belts as part of Project Argus. That experiment was intended to explore the methods by which electrons were trapped and traveled along magnetic field lines.

The acid test of the response of modern military systems to EMP is their performance in simulators, particularly where a large number of components are involved. So many cables, pins, connectors, and devices are to be found in real hardware that computation of the progress of the EMP signal cannot be predicted, even conceptually, after the field enters a real system. System failures or upsets will depend upon the most intricate details of current paths and interior electrical connections, and one cannot analyze these beforehand. Threat-level field illumination from simulators combined with pulsed-current injection are used to evaluate the survivability of a real system against an HEMP threat.

The technology to build simulators with risetimes on the order of 10 ns is well known. This risetime is, however, longer than that of a real HEMP signal. Since 1986 the United States has used a new EMP standard which requires waveforms at threat levels having risetimes under a few nanoseconds. Threat-level simulators provide the best technique for establishing the hardness of systems against early-time HEMP. They are, however, limited to finite volumes (aircraft, tanks, communications nodes) and cannot encompass an extended system. For these systems current injection must be used.

HEMP can pose a serious threat to military systems when even a single high-altitude nuclear explosion occurs. In principle, even a new nuclear proliferator could execute such a strike. In practice, however, it seems unlikely that such a state would use one of its scarce warheads to inflict damage which must be considered secondary to the primary effects of blast, shock, and thermal pulse. Furthermore, a HEMP attack must use a relatively large warhead to be effective (perhaps on the order of one mega-ton), and new proliferators are unlikely to be able to construct such a device, much less make it small enough to be lofted to high altitude by a ballistic missile or space launcher. Finally, in a tactical situation such as was encountered in the Gulf War, an attack by Iraq against Coalition forces would have also been an attack by Iraq against its own communications, radar, missile, and power systems. EMP cannot be confined to only one side of the burst.

Source Region Electro-magnetic Pulse [SREMP] is produced by low-altitude nuclear bursts. An effective net vertical electron current is formed by the asymmetric deposition of electrons in the atmosphere and the ground, and the formation and decay of this current emits a pulse of electromagnetic radiation in directions perpendicular to the current. The asymmetry from a low-altitude explosion occurs because some electrons emitted downward are trapped in the upper millimeter of the Earth’s surface while others, moving upward and outward, can travel long distances in the atmosphere, producing ionization and charge separation. A weaker asymmetry can exist for higher altitude explosions due to the density gradient of the atmosphere.

Within the source region, peak electric fields greater than 10 5 V/m and peak magnetic fields greater than 4,000 A/m can exist. These are much larger than those from HEMP and pose a considerable threat to military or civilian systems in the affected region. The ground is also a conductor of electricity and provides a return path for electrons at the outer part of the deposition region toward the burst point. Positive ions, which travel shorter distances than electrons and at lower velocities, remain behind and recombine with the electrons returning through the ground. Thus, strong magnetic fields are produced in the region of ground zero. When the nuclear detonation occurs near to the ground, the SREMP target may not be located in the electromagnetic far field but may instead lie within the electro-magnetic induction region. In this regime the electric and magnetic fields of the radiation are no longer perpendicular to one another, and many of the analytic tools with which we understand EM coupling in the simple plane-wave case no longer apply. The radiated EM field falls off rapidly with increasing distance from the deposition region (near to the currents the EMP does not appear to come from a point source).

As a result, the region where the greatest damage can be produced is from about 3 to 8 km from ground zero. In this same region structures housing electrical equipment are also likely to be severely damaged by blast and shock. According to the third edition of The Effects of Nuclear Weapons, by S. Glasstone and P. Dolan, the threat to electrical and electronic systems from a surface-burst EMP may extend as far as the distance at which the peak overpressure from a 1-megaton burst is 2 pounds per square inch.

One of the unique features of SREMP is the high late-time voltage which can be produced on long lines in the first 0.1 second. This stress can produce large late-time currents on the exterior shields of systems, and shielding against the stress is very difficult. Components sensitive to magnetic fields may have to be specially hardened. SREMP effects are uniquely nuclear weapons effects.

During the Cold War, SREMP was conceived primarily as a threat to the electronic and electrical systems within hardened targets such as missile launch facilities. Clearly, SREMP effects are only important if the targeted systems are expected to survive the primary damage-causing mechanisms of blast, shock, and thermal pulse. Because SREMP is uniquely associated with nuclear strikes, technology associated with SREMP generation has no commercial applications. However, technologies associated with SREMP measurement and mitigation are commercially interesting for lightning protection and electromagnetic compatibility applications. Basic physics models of SREMP generation and coupling to generic systems, as well as numerical calculation, use unclassified and generic weapon and target parameters. However, codes and coupling models which reveal the response and vulnerability of current or future military systems are militarily critical.

Sources and Methods

Greatest Nuclear Threat to the US

is Russia… as I’ve been saying for years.

Expert: ‘Biggest Nuclear Threat To The American People Might Well Be’ Russia

By Candice Leigh Helfand

October 4, 2013 11:22 AM

WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) – President Barack Obama recently welcomed the new Iranian government’s pursuit of a “more moderate course,” saying it should offer the basis for a breakthrough on Iran’s nuclear impasse with the United Nations and the U.S. He signaled a willingness to directly engage Iran’s leaders, tasking Secretary of State John Kerry with pursuing that diplomacy with Tehran.

“The roadblocks may prove to be too great, but I firmly believe the diplomatic path must be tested,” Obama said last week during an address to the U.N. General Assembly.

Last Friday, Obama made good on his promise of direct engagement when he spoke with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani during a telephone call that marked the first contact between leaders of the two nations since 1979, and expressed optimism regarding both Iranian-American relations in and of themselves as well as the continuation of discussions surrounding Iran’s nuclear weapons program.

In America, the concept of nuclear warfare was, for several decades, a frequent topic of media coverage and a prominent issue leveraged for American propaganda during the Cold War, which spanned 1945 to 1990. In the years following World War II – when the U.S. used two nuclear weapons to strike the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in what are still, to date, the only uses of nuclear weapons during war by any nation against another nation – the U.S. began development of its own nuclear weapons program at a significantly elevated rate.

http://washington.cbslocal.com/2013/10/04/expert-biggest-nuclear-threat-to-the-american-people-might-well-be-russia/